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Chapter 10.8


Planning Top Ten List
(Oregon Planners' Journal, March/April 1996)

By Richard H. Carson

The Following is the Top 10 List of reasons why the Portland Metropolitan Homebuilders were able to push through the new Expedited Land Division legislation:

#10. The legislature thought planners had so much spare time on their hands that they could speed up the land division process and still have time to make leather wallets for the homebuilders.

# 9.Noted land use attorney... used so many expletives in legislative committee hearings on the bill that he confused many legislators into thinking it was the "Expletive" Land Division bill.

# 8.For some reason, homebuilders mistakenly thought the new "Expletive" Land Division bill would allow them to use four-letter words in pre-app conferences.

#7.The Governors Office fell for the homebuilders ruse that it was the "Extended" Land Division bill which would extend land division approvals up to 60 months.

# 6.The homebuilders were convinced it was the "Extended" Lexus bill and thought they could get a 60-month extension on their Lexus car payments.

#5.Urban legislators threatened to only fund a South/North Light Rail Line that ran alongside the Western Bypass - unless the land division bill was passed.

#4.Rural legislators threatened to only fund a South/North Light Rail Line that ran from the Redmond airport to Sunriver - unless the land division bill was passed.

#3.The homebuilders believed the bill would allow for two-for-one "blue light" specials on the number of building lots.

#2.The homebuilders were convinced that the Expedited Land Division bill meant expedited lands divisions in the 7,000 acres of land that Metro assured them were to be added to the Portland metropolitan area's urban growth boundary.

And the number one reason why the Portland Metropolitan Homebuilders were able to push through the new Expedited Land Division legislation is:

#1.The homebuilder's lobbyist... successfully re-sold his soul to the devil.

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Common Sense
by Richard H. Carson